PEI Writers’ Guild Open Mic Series – Featuring Grant Matheson

Grant Matheson will be the featured reader at the PEI Writers’ Guild open mic on Thursday, February 8 at 7 p.m. at Receiver Coffee Co., 128 Richmond St., in Charlottetown.

All are welcome to this free event. The first ten writers to sign up may read from their work–poetry or prose–for up to 5 minutes. Following a short break to enjoy some of Receiver Coffee’s delicious offerings, Grant will read.

Grant Matheson is a non-practicing family physician, and father of three who has been in recovery from narcotic addiction since 2005. He practiced both in Montague and Charlottetown during his years as a physician. He now writes about his struggles with opioid addiction in the hopes that he can help others who have loved ones who are struggling, or others who are struggling themselves. His memoir, The Golden Boy, was published by Nimbus Publishing in 2017.

The PEI Writers’ Guild Open Mic Series will continue to run on the second Thursday of each month.

Battle Tales III: WRITING PROMPTS!


Greetings all you heroic (and decidedly nice-looking) writers of PEI! Are you ready to partake in the third-ever Battle Tales short story contest? If so, you’ve come to the right place. Behold your writing prompts:

  1. An urgent message left in haste.
  2. A vivid memory evoked by a familiar scent.
  3. A conversation only partially heard.

Now remember: your story must include all three of these prompts. Beyond that, it’s up to you. Be creative. Take these prompts and build something lovely with them. Really give our judge the run for his money.

Maybe that urgent message was scrawled in lipstick on the back of a napkin, or perhaps those few words of conversation you heard had something to do with an old, jealous flame. And what was that smell? Did it remind you of your grandmother’s oatmeal bread? Or was it the aroma of old fish down by the docks? Who knows. It’s up to you to tell us.

Oh, don’t forget to checkout out the contest rules before you get started. We want a good, clean battle, after all. None of that guerrilla warfare stuff.

And while you’re here, check out this excellent advice to help guide your writing, prepared by our judge, Steven Mayoff.

Good luck, everyone. May the best literary gladiator win!

Battle Tales III: A Hot Tip From Our Judge

What makes a good Battle Tale? We asked Steven Mayoff, our esteemed Battle Tales judge, to share a few things he’s looking for in a submission. Here’s what he said:

“I will be judging the stories using the usual criteria of story and character development, language, etc. I will also be looking to see how creatively the three prompt words are integrated into the story, rather than just embedded so the story qualifies for the contest. Writers should also think about why this story is important to them. Give me a sense of it, not as an overt statement, but more imaginatively. Condense it to a single image or a situation or maybe as a bit of dialogue. Challenge yourselves and challenge me.”

Battle Tales III: Meet Your Judge!

Curious about who will be judging your totally-awesome, perfectly-standout submissions once the Battle Tales contest closes? Why, it’s none other than our Island-proud author and poet Steven Mayoff!

Steven Mayoff was born and raised in Montreal and moved to Prince Edward Island in 2001. His fiction and poetry have appeared in literary journals across Canada and the U.S. as well as in Ireland, Algeria, France, Wales, England and Croatia. He has written two books of fiction: the story collection Fatted Calf Blues (Turnstone Press, 2009) and the novel Our Lady Of Steerage (Bunim & Bannigan, 2015). Upcoming is a poetry collection Swinging Between Water And Stone to be published by Guernica Editions in 2019.

PEI Writers’ Guild Open Mic Series featuring Chuck Bowie


Chuck Bowie will be the featured reader at the PEI Writers’ Guild open mic on Thursday, January 11 at 7 p.m. at Receiver Coffee Co., 128 Richmond St., in Charlottetown.

All are welcome to this free event. The first ten writers to sign up may read from their work – poetry or prose – for 3 to 5 minutes. Following a short break to enjoy some of Receiver Coffee’s delicious offerings, Chuck will read.

Chuck Bowie graduated from the University of New Brunswick in Canada with a Bachelor Degree in Science. Originally from Miramichi, he continues to live on the East Coast of Canada. Growing up as an air force brat, his writing is influenced by the study of human nature and how people behave, habits he picked up as his family moved nineteen times in his first twenty one years. Chuck loves food, wine, music and travel and all play a role in his work.

His writing often draws upon elements of these experiences to round out his characters and plot lines. Chuck is involved in the world of music, supporting local musicians, occasionally playing with them and always celebrating their successes. Because he enjoys venting as much as the next fellow, Chuck will at times share his thoughts with a brief essay or blog, some of which can be found on his website.

He is working with his publisher to edit the fourth novel, entitled The Body On The Underwater Road, part of the suspense-thriller series Donovan: Thief For Hire. His newest published work is entitled Steal It All, and follows the books Three Wrongs and AMACAT.

The PEI Writers’ Guild Open Mic Series will continue to run on the second Thursday of each month.

 

Weaving the Narrative with Chuck Bowie – A New Workshop From the PEIWG

We here at the PEIWG have a brand new workshop happening this January 13th! Led by Chuck Bowie, our Atlantic Canadian representative of the Writers’ Union of Canada and best-selling mystery novelist, this workshop focuses on weaving arcs throughout a story’s narrative. It’s a must for anyone looking to start a longer writing project, or for those of us currently working away on one. Applicable to any creative long-form writing, this workshop aims to help you manage your arcs as you write, and discusses how to edit them during the revision stage.

We hope to see you there! For more information and to sign up, please check out our workshop page.

Battle Tales III: Return of the Short Story Contest

It’s 2018. The tree is down, the presents are packed away and the kids are back in school. You’ve made a resolution to get back into your writing, but Netflix and Facebook are keeping you from your work. If only there was some way of jump-starting your next writing project, some sort of challenge to keep you on the straight and narrow.

But wait — there is! The PEI Writers’ Guild is delighted to announce our brand new short story contest: Battle Tales III: Return of the Short Story Contest.

Head on over to our contest page for details. We’re here to free your creativity from the chilly winter doldrums.

31st Cox & Palmer Island Literary Awards: Call for Submissions

Call for Entry! The 2018 Cox & Palmer Island Literary Awards competition is open. The deadline is February 28, 2018. Submissions may now be made online, as well as by mail or at any public library.

For details, please check out our official announcement page. Entry forms for submissions via mail or the public library may be found here.


The Rotary Club of Charlottetown Royalty Creative Writing Awards for Young People competition is now open as well!  The deadline for submissions is February 28, 2018. Submissions may now be made online, as well as by mail or at any public library.

Further details are on our official announcement page. Students may wish to review our student submission rules, while teachers may be interested in brushing up on our teacher submission guidelines. Entry forms for submissions via mail or the public library can be found here.

Best of luck to all our entrants. We look forward to celebrating the art of writing with you at our gala events this coming May.

“Owen Connolly: The Making of a Legacy” – Book Launch!

A new book detailing the remarkable life and legacy of P.E.I. entrepreneur Owen Connolly will be launched at the UPEI Development and Alumni offices at 618 University Avenue from 2-4 p.m. on Saturday, November 18.

You may know Connolly as the iconic bust on top of the Churchill Arms building on Charlottetown’s Queen Street. In Owen Connolly: The Making of a Legacy, author Leonard Cusack relates the rags-to-riches story of this Irish immigrant, who emerged to become one of P.E.I.’s wealthiest merchants.

When Connolly died in 1887, he left almost his entire fortune to support the post-secondary education of Irish Roman Catholic Islanders. His estate has since distributed close to $3 million in bursaries.

Books will be available for purchase and signing. The book is published by the Estate of Owen Connolly and Island Studies Press.