Writing as a Tool for Healing: A Life Writing Workshop with Trevor Corkum and Joshua Lewis

Writing our truth can be difficult, but telling our stories also offers profound possibility for healing and integration. Current research shows that the ability to construct meaningful stories from our lives has an important impact on our health and well-being.

In this day-long workshop, we’ll explore our stories through a variety of lenses. Responding to guided writing prompts, crafting short narratives, and reflecting on some of the difficult and joyful moments of our lives, we’ll consider how story can be a source of personal insight and supportive healing. The workshop structure will include both individual and small group activities, and will be supported by embodied-wellness activities like meditation, therapeutic yoga, and breathwork to anchor us more deeply into our experience. We’ll also consider how the various layers of our identities shape our stories of being in the world. Themes we will
explore together include ideas of being at home in our bodies, belonging, and connection to ourselves and others.

For more information or to register for this workshop, please check out the workshop page!

THE CHOICE TO SEE: A POETRY WORKSHOP WITH CHAD NORMAN

April is National Poetry Month! In honour of this, the PEIWG will be hosting a full-day poetry workshop on Saturday, April 13th, with Nova Scotia poet, Chad Norman.

Cost is $50 for Guild members and $60 for non-members $30 for Guild members and $40 for non-members, and will take place at the Haviland Club in Charlottetown.

Are you 19 years old or younger? If so, contact [email protected] for a promo code to use during registration in order to get a special low price of $10!

Norman, who lives beside the high-tides of the Bay of Fundy, has given talks and readings in Denmark, Sweden, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, the US, and across Canada. His poems, which have been published all over the world, have been translated into Danish, Albanian, and Romanian. His latest collections are Selected & New Poems(Mosaic Press) and Waking Up On The Wrong Side Of the Sky (Grant Block Press).

For more information, check out the workshop page.

Battle Tales IV: Free Advice From Our Judge

What makes a good Battle Tale? We asked Steven Mayoff, our wise and very cool Battle Tales judge, to share a few things he’s looking for in a submission. Here’s what he said:

“I will be judging the stories using the usual criteria of story and character development, language, etc. I will also be looking to see how creatively the three prompt words are integrated into the story, rather than just embedded so the story qualifies for the contest. Writers should also think about why this story is important to them. Give me a sense of it, not as an overt statement, but more imaginatively. Condense it to a single image or a situation or maybe as a bit of dialogue. Challenge yourselves and challenge me.”

Villains: The Characters We Love to Hate – a New Workshop From Author Anne Emery

To register for this workshop, and to find out more, please see the event page.

What drives a good crime-mystery novel? The answer is obvious: a really bad, nasty, devious, twisted, elusive villain who’s always one step ahead of our poor hero as they desperately try to re-establish order and protect the innocent.

The PEI Writers’ Guild will present a day-long writing workshop on this topic on October 13 at the Haviland Club in Charlottetown. It will be led by Anne Emery, a Halifax lawyer and award-winning author of the Collins-Burke mystery series.

Her ninth novel, Lament for Bonnie, is now available in hard cover. Anne has won a number of awards and writing prizes, including the 2007 Arthur Ellis Award for Best First Novel for her novel Sign of the Cross. Find out more about Anne here.

Anne will explore the factors that contribute to engaging villains, and how villains can be used to drive a story narrative. Participants will be tasked with defining what they enjoy in a villain, sharing villains in their own stories, and will be given the opportunity to create new villains based on the material covered in the workshop.

Registration is open now! To register and to find out more, please see the workshop page.

The Shoe Project Presents IN OUR SHOES

WHAT SHOES BROUGHT YOU HERE? WHAT SHOES DID YOU LEAVE BEHIND, DREAM YOU’D WEAR, OR DISCOVER?

The Shoe Project presents In Our Shoes, stories of arrival in Canada told through a pair of shoes, by 8 amazing women from around the world. The Royal Society Atlantic sponsors performances bringing together TSP members from Toronto, Halifax and Calgary.

The Shoe Project has performed to standing ovations in Toronto, Calgary, Halifax, and Canmore, Alberta and has been heard on CBC’s The National and Ideas and more.

EVENT INFORMATION

Date: April 21, 2018
Location: The Guild, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
Time: 7.30pm
For tickets, email: [email protected]
*Reception will follow after performance

MEDIA LINKS

ABOUT THE SHOE PROJECT

The Shoe Project was founded in Toronto in 2011, and is directed by novelist Katherine Govier. Its mission is to improve the written and spoken English of women immigrants and refugees, and to make their voices heard in Canada’s national conversation. In 2018 The Shoe Project will hold workshops and performances in Toronto, Canmore, Calgary, Vancouver, Fredericton and Charlottetown.

Meet Canada’s Parliamentary Poet Laureate

poet laureate

The PEI Writers’ Guild invites the public to an evening with Canada’s Parliamentary Poet Laureate, Dr. George Elliott Clarke. The event will take place Thursday September 7, 7 p.m. at the Confederation Centre Art Gallery. ECMA-winning musician Scott Parsons will provide musical accompaniment.

Admission is free and all are welcome. A cash bar will be available.

The 7th Parliamentary Poet Laureate (2016-17), George Elliott Clarke is a revered artist in song, drama, fiction, screenplay, essays, and poetry. Now teaching African-Canadian literature at the University of Toronto, Clarke has taught at Duke, McGill, the University of British Columbia, and Harvard. He holds eight honorary doctorates, plus appointments to the Order of Nova Scotia and the Order of Canada.

PEI welcomes George Elliott Clarke’s first Island visit since receiving the national honour. Dr. Clarke will share a selection of his work from a wide-ranging literary career, with particular emphasis on the first two volumes of his epic poem Canticles I, dealing with slavery and imperialism. Clarke is known for both his scholarship and his compelling speaking skills.

As an award winning Canadian writer, Clarke has published in a variety of genres including fiction, poetry, prose and drama. He has received national and international recognition for his work, which is the subject of Africadian Atlantic: Essays on George Elliott Clarke (2012), edited by Joseph Pivato.

There will be copies of the Poet Laureate’s work Canticles, as well as recited poetry CDs available, cash sales only. A book signing and refreshments/beverages will follow the event.