Esi Edugyan, author of WASHINGTON BLACK at the Mack Theatre Nov. 12

We are thrilled to welcome author Esi Edugyan to The Mack Theatre for a reading, Q&A and book signing. Esi’s new novel, Washington Black has been shortlisted for the 2018 Man Booker Prize and longlisted for the 2018 Giller Prize. It is a dazzling, original novel of slavery and freedom, from the author of the international bestseller Half-Blood Blues. From the blistering cane fields of Barbados to the icy plains of the Canadian Arctic, from the mud-drowned streets of London to the eerie deserts of Morocco, Washington Black teems with all the strangeness of life. This inventive, electrifying novel asks, What is Freedom? And can a life salvaged from the ashes ever be made whole? The evening will be hosted by Lee Ellen Pottie, well known UPEI professor, writer and editor. This event is free, and is hosted by Bookmark.

Please note the location for this event has been changed to the Mack Theatre, from the Confederation Centre of the Arts Studio One.

A Poet For All Seasons – A.F. Moritz Reading at UPEI

In a Globe and Mail review, Doug Fetherling writes, “In somewhat the same way that a person can become a highly decorated soldier, A.F. Moritz has become a highly decorated poet. The process has taken years.” With a half-century of campaigns on the poetic front, twenty books, and a wall-full of awards, A.F. (Al) Moritz will give a Winter’s Tales reading in Charlottetown on Monday, October 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the UPEI Faculty Lounge.

Moritz’ all-seasons subject matter includes love and eroticism; divine presence and mortality; contemplation of nature; history, modernity, and current events; philosophical, ethical, sociological, and political inquiry; and an elegant evocation of life’s exaltation and ennui, emptiness and fulness.

He won Canada’s most lucrative poetry prize, the Griffin, with The Sentinel. In the title poem, readers witness the anxieties of a sentinel for an armed camp bedded down for the night. He must report to his commanders, who may find him lacking or, worse, a foreign agent. Mortiz says it is also “an allegory of the poet and poetry” – the poet at once a far-seeing scout, ethical bellwether, and troublemaker.

Born in Ohio, Moritz moved to Toronto in 1974, worked in journalism and advertising, and has taught part-time at the University of Toronto since 1986. “I’ve never considered myself anything but a poet who does other things to support himself.” As famous literary critic Harold Bloom said, Moritz is “a true poet.” At UPEI, he will read from his newest book, The Sparrow, a selection of poems from his forty-five year vocation.

The evening is sponsored by the UPEI Dean of Arts and Department of English, with generous support from The Canada Council for the Arts.

An Evening with David Helwig

To date, Canadian poet, novelist, and essayist David Helwig has published close to fifty books and edited numerous others. He has written for television and radio, worked at the CBC, taught at Queen’s University, been Poet Laureate of Prince Edward Island, and named to the Order of Canada. Yet, he remains little known.

David Helwig: Essays on His Works is the first book to gather new essays, an interview, and earlier material — by George Fetherling, Douglas Glover, D.G. Jones, Simon Lloyd, Tom Marshall, Rob McLennan, Shane Neilson, Ingrid Ruthig, Mark Sampson, and Lorraine M. York — in order to introduce and explore Helwig’s body of work while documenting the broad range of his literary talents and accomplishments.

The editor of this edition, Ingrid Ruthig, writer, poet, visual artist, said, “Within any literary community there are those writers who simply go about the business of writing — diligent, dedicated, building a body of work without fanfare. They seem disinclined to court chatter and celebrity, to inflate image and ego, or to stake out a place centre-stage. David Helwig is one of those unassuming craftsmen. Since he first aspired to it more than six decades ago, he has been living “the life of a writer.”

On September 25th at 7:30 PM at The Carriage House, 2 Kent Street, Bookmark and PEI’s Poet Laureate PEI, Deirdre Kessler, along with 20 Island poets and writers will present an evening to celebrate David Helwig and his remarkable literary accomplishments. This event is free and the public are encouraged to attend and meet a Prince Edward Island literary giant.

Lobsters, Armageddon, and Poetry – Book Launches at Beaconsfield

Two Island poets, Steve McOrmond and Chris Bailey, will launch their new books on Monday, September 17, at 7:00 p.m. in the Carriage House at Beaconsfield in Charlottetown. McOrmond’s poetry has captivated readers across Canada since his first book, Lean Days, in 2004, while Bailey, from a North Lake fishing family, is a newcomer to the literary scene.

Bailey, a recent UPEI Psychology graduate, has been living in Toronto and Hamilton, earning a Master’s degree in Creative Writing. He comes home during the summers, working on the family boat. Many of the poems in What Your Hands Have Done (Nightwood Editions) focus on the lives, work, and relationships of fishing families. This is the first major poetry book by an Islander to honour, at length, the realities and lore of PEI’s fishing community.

Bailey’s interests also range beyond the traditional land/seascape and livelihoods of PEI. His influences vary from Elmore Leonard, Warren Zevon, and Charles Bukowski – the “laureate of American lowlife” wrote Time – to Neil Gaiman and Lorna Crozier. Just as the wider culture’s zeitgeist pervades the Island, Bailey’s poems take readers on lively trips beyond the decks, wharves, and fishers’ homes.

McOrmond’s imaginative takes on experience, and his satirical wit, are evident in his other book titles: Primer for the Hereafter and The Goods News About Armageddon. With ironic perceptions in “Come Play on the Island,” he contrasts touristic summers with our winters, and in “The Lobster” he reveals the sardonic “second thoughts” of a PEI restaurant cook. In a bittersweet voice, he evokes Maritime outmigration in “So This Is Goodbye”: “The story of the Island is the story of paradise: / we have always had to leave.”

A 1995 UPEI graduate, Steve has lived in Toronto for two decades, returning yearly to the Island. His metropolitan experiences and computer software business career ingeniously permeate his new book, Reckon (Brick Book): “And we felt fortunate to live in the afterglow of Steve Jobs” and though “the air smells like burning tires…I love it here, I really do”;

His new poems reflect and critique the growing domination of our lives and consciousness by digital platforms and realms: “Deep in an offshore data centre, my vagaries / are tracked, time-stamped, mined / for meaningful adjacencies.”

A special guest poet, Annick MacAskill from Halifax, will give a short reading, followed by McOrmond’s and Bailey’s featured readings, a book signing, and a reception. The evening is sponsored by the UPEI Dean of Arts and Department of English, with generous support from The Canada Council for the Arts.

Book Launch: The Secret of Bowring Park by Christine Gordon Manley

Christine Gordon Manley invites anyone who believes in the magic within to help her launch The Secret of Bowring Park on July 17 at 6:30pm at the Confederation Centre Library.

Every child who has ever visited the Peter Pan statue in St. John’s, NL, swears that it is magic. They know that the mice, squirrels, rabbits, and fairies are never in the same place as the last time they visited. Some say they’ve seen Peter wink at them, and others believe they’ve heard the soft whispering sounds of a flute. Are the stories true? Is the Peter Pan statue really magic? Or are the tales just childhood fantasies?

The Secret of Bowring Park, is a story of magic, eternal wonder, and the bond between sisters.

This early reader chapter book includes beautiful illustrations by Newfoundland artist Laurel Keating and is published through Breakwater Books.

A freelance editor, Christine co-owns communications and marketing company, Manley Mann Media, with fellow PEI author Jaime Lee Mann. She’s worked on over 40 books, including fiction, memoirs, children’s books, educational material, YA, and even cookbooks.

Christine’s short stories have appeared in various magazines, websites, and journals, with “I’ll Always Make it Back Home” winning Honourable Mention and publication in Canada’s Tales of the Fantastic (2017). She won third place in the Island Literary Awards in 2015 (children’s category) and was a Round Two Finalist for CANSCAIP children’s story national contest in 2016.

Christine was born, and grew up, in Mount Pearl, Newfoundland. While she fell in love with the red soil of PEI, where she now lives, the rocky shores of Newfoundland are never far from her mind. She can attribute her love of a good cup of tea, tender moose stew, driving to reach that perfect scenic view, and getting outside on any decent day to her own Newfoundland childhood.

The launch is co-hosted by The Bookmark and Breakwater Books and is an all-ages event. Rumour has it there will be Tinkerbell-themed treats available.

Jeopardy: New Poems by Richard Lemm

Richard Lemm, one of PEI’s best-known authors and a UPEI English professor for many years, will launch his new poetry book, Jeopardy, on Friday, June 29, at 7:00 pm in the Carriage House of Beaconsfield Historic House at . Lemm’s poems take readers on memorable journeys, from the Arab Spring in Egypt to climate change on the Island. Acorn Press, the publisher, will host the launch and reception.

Nasreen Pejvack at the Confederation Centre Public Library Saturday April 21

Nasreen  Pejvack will be visiting Confederation Centre Public Library Saturday April 21, 2:00 p.m. as part of a cross country tour introducing her newest books, “Paradise of the Downcasts” and “Waiting.”

“Paradise of the Downcasts” is a book of short stories inspired by the author’s experiences of life in Canada, a gracefully crafted series of stories in which the author invites us to examine the way we deal with each other in life’s sojourn. “Waiting” is a book of poems that delve deeply into the soul of humanity to pull out wonder, greed, love and hope.

Born in Tehran, Iran, a place she left over 30 years ago, the author has lived in Athens, Ottawa, California, before finally settling in Vancouver.  She previously visited Confederation Centre Public Library in 2015 when she launched her first novel, “Amity.”

The Shoe Project Presents IN OUR SHOES

WHAT SHOES BROUGHT YOU HERE? WHAT SHOES DID YOU LEAVE BEHIND, DREAM YOU’D WEAR, OR DISCOVER?

The Shoe Project presents In Our Shoes, stories of arrival in Canada told through a pair of shoes, by 8 amazing women from around the world. The Royal Society Atlantic sponsors performances bringing together TSP members from Toronto, Halifax and Calgary.

The Shoe Project has performed to standing ovations in Toronto, Calgary, Halifax, and Canmore, Alberta and has been heard on CBC’s The National and Ideas and more.

EVENT INFORMATION

Date: April 21, 2018
Location: The Guild, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
Time: 7.30pm
For tickets, email: [email protected]
*Reception will follow after performance

MEDIA LINKS

ABOUT THE SHOE PROJECT

The Shoe Project was founded in Toronto in 2011, and is directed by novelist Katherine Govier. Its mission is to improve the written and spoken English of women immigrants and refugees, and to make their voices heard in Canada’s national conversation. In 2018 The Shoe Project will hold workshops and performances in Toronto, Canmore, Calgary, Vancouver, Fredericton and Charlottetown.

Maritimes Music: Request for Book Proposals

A new company, Maritimes Music will begin operations in the summer of 2018. The company plans to release music related to the three maritime provinces plus Newfoundland and Labrador. In addition, Maritimes music is looking for books that deal with the musical past or present of these four provinces. These can be fiction or nonfiction. The goal is to publish books that illuminate the rich musical heritage of Atlantic Canada.

Please submit proposals to [email protected]. Your proposal should include a description of your book, a possible table of contents, a brief biography which highlights the author’s expertise in the subject matter, a list of any previously published works, and other information which the author might see as useful in the evaluation of their project.

The proposal should be between two and six pages. Please do not send any completed manuscripts at this time. Also, make sure that you have both email and telephone listed so that we are able to contact you.